NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 2

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 2 New Kings and Kingdoms (अध्याय 2: नये राजा और उनके राज्य) free  to View online. All the NCERT Solutions are based on latest CBSE Books for the new academic session 2019 – 2020.


NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 2

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New Kings and Kingdoms: Question answers




7 Social Science – History – Chapter 2: Question Answers

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 2 new kings and kingdoms
NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 2 in PDF




NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 2 updated form
7 history chapter 2 answers

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Important Notes on Chapter 2

By the seventh century there were big landlords or warrior chiefs in different regions of the subcontinent. Existing kings often acknowledged them as their subordinates or samantas.
As samantas gained power and wealth, they declared themselves to be maha-samanta, maha-mandaleshvara (the great lord of a “circle” or region) and so on. Sometimes they asserted their independence from their overlords.
Many of these new kings adopted high-sounding titles such as maharaja-adhiraja (great king, overlord of kings), tribhuvana-chakravartin (lord of the three worlds) and so on.
In each of these states, resources were obtained from the producers – that is, peasants, cattle-keepers, artisans – who were often persuaded or compelled to surrender part of what they produced. Sometimes these were claimed as “rent” due to a lord who asserted that he owned the land. Revenue was also collected from traders.



Construction of Temples

These resources were used to finance the king’s establishment, as well as for the construction of temples and forts. They were also used to fight wars, which were in turn expected to lead to the acquisition of wealth in the form of plunder, and access to land as well as trade routes.
Prashastis contain details that may not be literally true. But they tell us how rulers wanted to depict themselves – as valiant, victorious warriors, for example. These were composed by learned Brahmanas, who occasionally helped in the administration.
Unusual for the twelfth century was a long Sanskrit poem containing the history of kings who ruled over Kashmir. It was composed by an author named Kalhana.
One of the best known of such rulers is Sultan
Mahmud of Ghazni, Afghanistan. He ruled from 997 to 1030, and extended control over parts of Central Asia, Iran and the north-western part of the subcontinent.
Sultan Mahmud was also interested in finding out more about the people he conquered, and entrusted a scholar named Al-Biruni to write an account of the subcontinent.


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