NCERT Solutions for Class 7 English Honeycomb Chapter 8

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 English Honeycomb Chapter 8 Fire: Friend and Foe  & Poem 8 Meadow Surprises is given below. 7th English Chapter 8 comprehension check, working with the text, working with language, speaking and writing skills. Download NCERT Solutions of other subjects as well as Offline Apps for Class 7 all subjects.


Class:7
Subject:English – Honeycomb
Chapter:Fire: Friend and Foe

Table of Contents

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 English Honeycomb Chapter 8

Honeycomb Chapter 8: Question – Answers

7 English Chapter 8: Fire: Friend and Foe – Answers

7 English Chapter 8: Fire: Friend and Foe




7 English Chapter 8: Fire: Friend and Foe answers
7 Eng ch. 8




7th English ch. 8
7th English class 8


Visit to Class 7 English or Top of the page

7 English Poem 8: Meadow Surprises – Answers

7 English Poem 8: Meadow Surprises

Visit to Class 7 English or Top of the page

Passages with Question Answer
I. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

Fire may have puzzled early man but we now know that fire is the result of a chemical reaction. When the oxygen in the air combines with carbon and hydrogen in a fuel, a chemical reaction takes place. Energy in the form of heat and light is released in this process. This is what we call fire.

Questions:

1. Name the lesson.
2. What puzzled early man?
3. What is fire? See Answers



II. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

Fuel and oxygen do not make fire by themselves, or else a newspaper or a stick lying in the open would catch fire on its own. To burn a piece of paper or wood, we heat it before it catches fire. We generally do it with a lighted match. Every fuel has a particular temperature at which it begins to burn. This temperature is called the ‘flash point’ or ‘kindling temperature’ of the fuel.

Questions:

1. What is ‘flash point’?
2. Write two uses of fire?
3. Do fuel and oxygen make fire by themselves? See Answers

III. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

Long ago, there were no firemen. When fire broke out, everybody became a firefighter. People formed human chains (they still do if required) and passed buckets of water from a well or a pond to the blaze. Now there are laws about building construction which ensure that space is left between buildings to reduce the fire risk. Every new building, especially a public place, must ensure observance of fire prevention norms. Bands of firefighting workers with special equipment, known as fire brigades, are there to put out fires.

Questions:

1. Name the lesson.
2. When there were no firemen, how did people control the fire broke out?
3. What are fire brigades? See Answers

Answers for passages
Comprehension Passage I – Answers

1. The name of the lesson is ‘Fire: Friend and Foe’.
2. Fire may have puzzled early man.
3. During the chemical reactions, energy is released in the form of heal and light, which is called fire.

Comprehension Passage II – Answers

1. The temperature at which it begins to burn is known as ‘flash point’.
2. (i). Cook our food. (ii). Warm our houses.
3. No, fuel and oxygen do not make fire by themselves.


Comprehension Passage III – Answers

1. The name of the lesson is ‘Fire: Friend and Foe’.
2. When fire broke out, everybody do his best. They formed human chains and passed buckets of water from a well or a pond to the blaze.
3. Bands of firefighting workers with special equipment is known as fire brigades.

Visit to Class 7 English or Top of the page

Download NCERT Solutions Apps for offline use.

What are some common uses of fire?

The common uses of fire are to cook food, warm our homes in winter, to generate electricity and many more.

In what sense is it a “bad master”?

Fire is “bad master” when it gets out of control. It can be very dangerous. Each year thousands of houses, shops and vast forest areas are damaged by fire. It also kills and injures hundreds of people every year.

What are the three main ways in which a fire can be controlled or put out?

The three main ways in which a fire can be controlled or put out are:
By taking fuel away from fire. If the fire has no fuel to feed on, no burning can take place.
By cutting the supply of oxygen from reaching it.
By bringing back the temperature below ‘flash point’ of the fuel.

Why does a burning candle go out when you blow on it?

When we blow a candle, the hot air around the flame is removed which brings down the temperature of candle and it goes out. Thus, a candle goes out because no fuel can burn below its flash point.

Spraying water is not a good way of putting out an oil fire or an electrical fire. Why not?

Sometimes water is sprayed on a fire. It absorbs the heat from the burning fuel. Blanket of water also cuts of the oxygen and the fire gets extinguished. But sometimes spraying water cannot put out the fire. It is not a good way of putting out an oil fire or an electrical fire. When water is sprayed onto an oil fire, the oil will float to the top of the water and continue to burn. This can be very dangerous because water can flow quickly carrying the burning oil with it and spreading the fire. The person spraying water on an electrical fire might receive an electric shock and be killed.

What are some of the things you should do to prevent a fire at home and in the school?

Some of the things we should do to prevent a fire at home or at school:
Precaution is better than cure. We should be alert about the use of inflammable substances and handle it with care.
There is always possibility of catching fire in old buildings of home and school due to short circuits. Therefore, over loaded wires should be replaced with new ones and Fuse should be checked at regular interval.
By spreading the knowledge about the handling of fuel, its flash point and about its protection after an accident.
Fire extinguishers should be installed and old wiring must be replaced.
Not storing inflammable or combustible things like kerosene and petrol in our homes and in the school.

Which line in the poem suggests that you need a keen eye and a sharp ear to enjoy a meadow? Read aloud the stanza that contains this line.

The line in the poem suggests that you need a keen eye and a sharp ear to enjoy a meadow.

“Oh! Meadows have surprises
And many things to tell;
You may discover these yourself,
If you look and listen well.”

Find pictures of the kinds of birds, insects and scenes mentioned in the poem.

Students will do this by themselves by collecting the pictures of butterfly, rabbit, ants, birds etc.

Watch a tree or a plant, or walk across a field or park at the same time every day for a week. Keep a diary of what you see and hear. At the end of the week, write a short paragraph or a poem about your experiences.

The beauty of nature is worth appreciation. It is the foundation of life and an abode of livelihood. So I sat down to take a glance on the flowers in my garden. The vibrant colours, the beautiful long-short stems in big beautiful vases are worth a site. For me, roses are the queen of all flowers. Every time I saw those roses, I felt it was an abode of feeling of love, friendship and heaven.