NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 1

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 1 Tracing Changes Through a Thousand Years (अध्याय 1: हज़ार वर्षों के दौरान हुए परिवर्तन की पड़ताल) free  to View online. All the NCERT Solutions are based on latest NCERT Books for the academic session 2019 – 20.


NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 1

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Tracing Changes through a Thousand Years: Question answers

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7 Social Science – History – Chapter 1: Question Answers

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 1 Tracing Changes Through a Thousand Years NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science History Chapter 1 in PDF




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Important Notes on Chapter 1

When historians read documents, maps and texts from the past they have to be sensitive to the different historical backgrounds – the contexts – in which information about the past was produced.
Historical records exist in a variety of languages which have changed considerably over the years. Medieval Persian, for example, is different from modern Persian.
While the idea of a geographical and cultural entity like “India” did exist, the term “Hindustan” did not carry the political and national meanings which we associate with it today.
In the medieval period a “foreigner” was any stranger who appeared say in a given village, someone who was not a part of that society or culture. (In Hindi the term pardesi might be used to describe such a person and in Persian, ajnabi.) A city-dweller, therefore, might have regarded a forest-dweller as a “foreigner”, but two peasants living in the same village were not foreigners to each other, even though they may have had different religious or caste backgrounds



Compare the following

(1) In the middle of the thirteenth century a scholar wanted to copy a book. But he did not have enough paper. So he washed the writing off a manuscript he did not want, dried the paper and used it.
(2) A century later, if you bought some food in the market you could be lucky and have the shopkeeper wrap it for you in some paper.
Manuscripts were collected by wealthy people, rulers, monasteries and temples. They were placed in libraries and archives. These manuscripts and documents provide a lot of detailed information to historians but they are also difficult to use.
The fourteenth-century chronicler Ziyauddin Barani wrote his chronicle first in 1356 and another version two years later. The two differ from each other but historians did not know about the existence of the first version until the 1960s. It remained lost in large library collections.


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