NCERT Solutions for Class 8 Social Science Civics Chapter 7

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 Social Science Civics Chapter 7 Understanding Marginalisation (अध्याय 7: हाशियाकरण की समझ) (Unit 4 of Social and Political Life – III ) to Study online free with latest NCERT Books to free download. Download NCERT Solutions for other subjects also.


NCERT Solutions for Class 8 Social Science Civics Chapter 7

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Understanding Marginalisation: Question Answers

8 Civics Chapter 7 Understanding Marginalisation Answers

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 Social Science Civics Chapter 7 Understanding Marginalisation




NCERT Solutions for Class 8 Social Science Civics Chapter 7 in English Medium

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Important Questions on 8 Civics Chapter 7
What does it mean to be Socially Marginalised?

To be marginalised is to be forced to occupy the sides or fringes and thus not be at the centre of things. Sometimes, marginalised groups are viewed with hostility and fear. This sense of difference and exclusion leads to communities not having access to resources and opportunities and in their inability to assert their rights. They experience a sense of disadvantage and powerlessness vis-a-vis more powerful and dominant sections of society who own land, are wealthy, better educated and politically powerful. Thus, marginalisation is seldom experienced in one sphere. Economic, social, cultural and political factors work together to make certain groups in society feel marginalised.



Who are Adivasis?

Adivasis – the term literally means ‘original inhabitants’ – are communities who lived, and often continue to live, in close association with forests. There are over 500 different Adivasi groups in India. Adivasis are particularly numerous in states like Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Orissa,
Gujarat, Maharashtra, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal and in the north-eastern states of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura. A state like Orissa is home to more than 60 different tribal groups.

Adivasi societies are also most distinctive because there is often very little hierarchy among them. Adivasis practise a range of tribal religions that are different from Islam, Hinduism and Christianity. These often involve the worship of ancestors, village and nature spirits, the last associated with and residing in various sites in the landscape – ‘mountain-spirits’, ‘river-spirits’, ‘animal-spirits’, etc. The village spirits are often worshipped at specific sacred groves within the village boundary while the ancestral ones are usually worshipped at home. Additionally, Adivasis have always been influenced by different surrounding religions like Shakta, Buddhist, Vaishnav, Bhakti and Christianity.


How Adivasis are related with Stereotyping?

In India, we usually ‘showcase’ Adivasi communities in particular ways. Thus, during school functions or other official events or in books and movies, Adivasis are invariably portrayed in very stereotypical ways – in colourful costumes, headgear and through their dancing. Besides this, we seem to know very little about the realities of their lives. This often wrongly leads to people believing that they are exotic, primitive and backward. Often Adivasis are blamed for their lack of advancement as they are believed to be resistant to change or new ideas.


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