NCERT Solutions for Class 6 Maths Chapter 4 Exercise 4.3

NCERT Solutions for Class 6 Maths Chapter 4 Exercise 4.3 (Ex. 4.3) Basic Geometrical Ideas in Hindi Medium as well as English Medium free to use online or download for offline. All the solutions for grade 6 mathematics are updated for CBSE session 2020-21 in simplified way.

All the steps are mentioned properly, so that students can understand easily.

Class 6 Maths Chapter 4 Exercise 4.3 Solution

Class: 6Mathematics
Chapter: 4Basic Geometrical Ideas
Exercise: 4.3English and Hindi Medium Solutions

App for Class 6 Maths in Hindi and English

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Class 6 Maths Chapter 4 Exercise 4.3 Solution in Videos

Class 6 Maths Chapter 4 Exercise 4.3 Solution
Class 6 Maths Chapter 4 Exercise 4.3 Explanation

Line Segment

Let A and B be two points in a plane and l be the line passing through A and B. The portion of the line l between points A and B is called the line segment AB. It is denoted by AB and read as ‘line segment AB’. The points A and B are called its end points. Thus, a line segment is completely known if its end points are known. The line segment AB can also be named as the line segment BA. It is denoted by AB or BA and is read as line segment AB or line segment BA.

Since there is only one line passing through two given points A and B in a plane, there is only one-line segment joining points A and B. Thus, two points in a plane determine exactly one segment.
The distance between the points A and B is called the length of the segment AB.
For the length of the segment AB, we shall use the symbol AB. Two line segments having the same length are said to be equal. If two line segments AB and CD are equal, we write AB = CD.



Comparison of Line Segments

By comparison of two line segments, we mean finding a relation between their lengths, i.e., to find which of them is longer or shorter or if they are equal.
We can compare two line segments by following methods:

(a) Comparison by Observation:

Look at the two line segments PQ and MN, just by observation, we can tell which of the line segments is shorter.

(b) Comparison by Tracing:

Let PQ and RS be two line segments. We want to compare their lengths. We take a tracing paper and trace the line segment RS on it with a ruler and a pencil. Now, we take this tracing paper and place it on PQ such that R is placed on P and line segment RS lies along line segment PQ. There are three possibilities for the location of point S on line segment PQ.
(i) If S is between P and Q, we say that line segment RS is shorter than line segment PQ.
(ii) If S is just on Q, we say that line segment RS is equal to line segment PQ. We write RS = PQ
(iii) If S is beyond Q, we say that line segment RS is greater than line segment PQ.
(c) Comparison by Divider
Let MN and OP be two given line segments. In order to compare two line segments MN and OP.

There are three possibilities:

(i) When the end point of the second arm falls on P, we say that the segments MN and OP are equal and we write MN = OP.
(ii) When the end point of the second arm falls between O and P, we say that the segment MN is smaller than or less than the segment OP and we write MN < OP. (iii) When the end point of the second arm falls beyond P, we say that the segment MN is greater than or larger than the segment OP and we write MN > OP.



How do you identify a line segment?

Lines, Segments, and Rays
A line can be named either using two points on the line (for example, A and B) or simply by a letter, usually lowercase (for example, line m).
A segment is named by its two endpoints, for example, AB.

What objects represent a line segment?

The edges on polygons (two-dimensional shapes), polyhedra (three-dimensional shapes), and polytopes (4+ dimensional shapes) are examples of line segments.

What is a real world example of a line segment?

Real-world examples of line segments are a pencil, a baseball bat, the cord to your cell phone charger, the edge of a table, etc. Think of a real-life quadrilateral, like a chessboard; it is made of four line segments. Unlike line segments, examples of line segments in real life are endless.

Is a line segment one dimensional?

A line or line segment has a dimension of one. To describe a point on a number line you only need to use one number. Remember that by definition, a line is straight. A shape or a plane has a dimension of two.

NCERT Solutions for Class 6 Maths Chapter 4 Exercise 4.3 in english
Class 6 Maths Chapter 4 Exercise 4.3 in Hindi