NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 7

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 7: Glimpses of India (A Baker from Goa, Coorg & Tea from Assam) and poem The Trees with Summery or Lesson & Poem This includes all answers of oral comprehension check, working with the text, working with language, speaking and writing skills, etc. Download Offline Apps based on updated NCERT Solutions for 2019-20.


Class 10:English – First Flight
Chapter 7:Glimpses of India

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 7

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A Letter to God: Question – Answers




10 English Chapter 7: Glimpses of India – Answers

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 7: Glimpses of India is given below with all questions answers, working with the text, working with language, writing and reading, oral comprehension check, etc. Visit to Poems question-answers or Class 10 English main page or Top of the page.

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 7




NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 7 updated for 2019-20
10 English Glimpses of India



10 English Tea from Assam
10 English Coorg



10 English Baker from Goa
10 English Chapter 7 Answers




Eng class 10 chapter 7
10 English solutions chapter 7




10 English

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10 English Poem: The Trees – Answers

NCERT Solutions for class 10 English poem The trees of chapter 7 is given below. Visit to First Flight Chapter 7 or Class 10 English main page or Top of the page.

NCERT Solutions for class 10 English poem The trees



10 English Poem

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Summery of Chapter and Poem

10 English Chapter 7 Summery

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Passages with Question Answer
I. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

During our childhood in Goa, the baker used to be our friend, companion and guide. He used to come at least twice a day. Once, when he set out in the morning on his selling round, and then again, when he returned after emptying his huge basket. The jingling thud of his bamboo woke us up from sleep and we ran to meet and greet him. Why was it so? Was it for the love of the loaf? Not at all. The loaves were bought by some Paskine or Bastine, the maid-servant of the house! What we longed for were those bread-bangles which we chose carefully. Sometimes it was sweet bread of special make.

Questions:

1. How did the children regard a baker in their childhood?
2. What made the children wake up from sleep?
3. Which word in the passage means the same as ‘wished for very much/desired earnestly’? See Answers

II. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

He would greet the lady of the house with “Good morning” and then place his basket on the vertical bamboo. We kids would be pushed aside with a mild rebuke and the loaves would be delivered to the servant. But we would not give up. We would climb a bench or the parapet and peep into the basket, somehow. I can still recall the typical fragrance of those loaves. Loaves for the elders and the bangles for the children. Then we did not even care to brush our teeth or wash our mouths properly.

Questions:

1. Why were the kids pushed aside?
2. Who is ‘he’ in the passage?
3. Choose a word from the passage which means ‘scold’. See Answers

III. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

They sipped the steaming hot liquid. Almost everyone in their compartment was drinking tea too. “Do you know that over eighty crore cups of tea are drunk every day throughout the world?” Rajvir said.
“Whew!” exclaimed Pranjol. “Tea really is very popular.”
The train pulled out of the station. Pranjol buried his nose in his detective book again.

Questions:

1. Who are they?
2. What did Pranjol do after the train started?
3. Which word in the passage means the same as ‘drank very small quantity at a time’? See Answers


Answers for passages
Comprehension Passage I – Answers

1. In their childhood, the children regarded a baker as their friend, companion and guide.
2. The jingling thud of the baker’s bamboo made the children wake up from sleep.
3. Longed for.

Comprehension Passage II – Answers

1. Kids caused trouble by surrounding the baker.
2. He refers to pader.
3. Rebuke.

Comprehension Passage III – Answers

1. ‘They’ here refers to Rajvir and Pranjol.
2. Pranjol started studying his detective again after the train started.
3. Sipped.

What are the elders in Goa nostalgic about?

The elders in Goa were heard reminiscing nostalgically about the good Old Portuguese days and their famous loaves of bread.

Is bread-making still popular in Goa? How do you know?

The author mentioned that the eaters of the famous bread loaves might have vanished but the makers were still there. He mentions the age-old time-tested furnaces existed and their fire had still not extinguished. Hence we can say that bread-making is still popular in Goa.

When would the baker come everyday? Why did the children run to meet him?

The author said that baker used to be their friend, companion and guide. The baker came at least twice a day. Once when he set out in the morning on his selling round, and then again, when he returned after emptying his huge basket. The jingling thud of his bamboo worked as an alarm for the children. They ran to meet him and greet him not because of their love of the loaf, which was bought by the maid-servant of the house. They actually longed for the bread-bangles, which they chose carefully. Sometimes, it was a sweet bread of special make.

What did the bakers wear: (i) in the Portuguese days? (ii) when the author was young?

(i) In the Portuguese days, the bakers had a peculiar dress known as the kabai. It was a single-piece long frock reaching down to the knees.
(ii) When the author was young, he saw the bakers wearing a shirt and trousers, which were shorter than full-length ones and longer than half pants.

Who invites the comment — “he is dressed like a pader”? Why?

Anyone who wears a half-pant which reaches just below the knees invites the comment that “he is dressed like a pader”. This was so because the bakers were known as pader and they wore such half pants.

Where were the monthly accounts of the baker recorded?

The bakers usually collected the bills at the end of the month. The monthly accounts of the baker were recorded on some wall in pencil. It was profitable profession in the old days.

What does a ‘jackfruit -like appearance’ mean?

The plump physique was referred as a ‘jackfruit-like appearance’. This physique was linked to the bakers because they never starved. Baking was a profitable profession back then. The baker, his family, and his servants always looked happy and prosperous and had a ‘jackfruit-like appearance’.

Is bread an important part of Goan life? How do you know this?

Bread is an integral part of Goan life. Marriage gifts are meaningless without the sweet bread known as the bol. It is difficult to say how important a baker can be for the village. For occasion of daughter’s engagement the lady of the house prepares sandwiches. Cakes and bolinhas are a must for Christmas. The author says that everybody loves the fragrance of loaves. The elders were given loaves and the children were given bread-bangles, which they longed for. Bakery is a profitable profession shows that the love for bread is enormous in Goa.

Where is Coorg?

Coorg is situated in the midway between Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore. It is the paradise on the Earth.

What is the story about the Kodavu people’s descent?

There are many stories about the Kodavu people’s descent. One of the story tells that the fiercely independent people of Kodavu are of Greek or Arabic origin. It is said that, a part of Alexander’s army men moved to south and settled there. Their costume, martial practices and marriage rituals also point to the fact that they are from Arabic origin.

What do you know about the people of Coorg?

The people of Coorg are fiercely independent. They are of Greek or Arabic descent. Coorgi homes have a tradition of hospitality. They are more than willing to recount numerous tales of valour related to their sons and fathers. Kodavus are the only people in India permitted to carry firearms without a license.