NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 11

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 11 The Making of the National Movement: 1870s – 1947 (राष्ट्रीय आंदोलन का संघटनः) in English Medium to Study online or download in PDF the latest NCERT Books and NCERT Solutions for other subjects also.


NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 11

Go back to 8 Social Science Main page

The Making of the National Movement: 1870s – 1947: Question Answers




8 History Chapter 11 The Making of the National Movement: 1870s – 1947 Solutions

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 11 The Making of the National Movement
NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 11 Free

Visit to 8 Social Science main page or Top of the Page




Important Notes on The Making of the National Movement

The Arms Act was passed in 1878, disallowing Indians from possessing arms. In the same year the Vernacular Press Act was also enacted in an effort to silence those who were critical of the government. The Act allowed the government to confiscate the assets of newspapers including their printing presses if the newspapers published anything that was found “objectionable”. In 1883, there was a furore over the attempt by the government to introduce the Ilbert Bill. The bill provided for the trial of British or European persons by Indians, and sought equality between British and Indian judges in the country.



A nation in the making

It has often been said that the Congress in the first twenty years was “moderate” in its objectives and methods. During this period it demanded a greater voice for Indians in the government and in administration. It wanted the Legislative Councils to be made more representative, given more power, and introduced in provinces where none existed. It demanded that Indians be placed in high positions in the government.


“Freedom is our birthright”

By the 1890s, in Bengal, Maharashtra and Punjab, leaders such as Bepin Chandra Pal, Bal Gangadhar Tilak and Lala Lajpat Rai were beginning to explore more radical objectives and methods. They criticised the Moderates for their “politics of prayers” and emphasised the importance of self-reliance and constructive work. They argued that people must rely on their own strength, not on the “good” intentions of the government; people must fight for swaraj. Tilak raised the slogan, “Freedom is my birthright and I shall have it!”


The Growth of Mass Nationalism
  • After 1919 the struggle against British rule gradually became a mass movement, involving peasants, tribals, students and women in large numbers and occasionally factory workers as well. Certain business groups too began to actively support the Congress in the 1920s.
    The First World War
  • The First World War altered the economic and political situation in India. It led to a huge rise in the defence expenditure of the Government of India. The government in turn increased taxes on individual incomes and business profits. Increased military expenditure and the demands for war supplies led to a sharp rise in prices which created great difficulties for the common people. On the other hand, business groups reaped fabulous profits from the war.